Scrambled Eggs Supreme

Here is a hearty breakfast or brunch dish that is often found on restaurant menus in northern Wisconsin. It’s called a skillet breakfast when the scrambled eggs are accompanied with fried or hash brown potatoes. When a side order of bacon, ham or sausage is added, the price goes up and the name changes to a “Farmers” or “Lumberjack” skillet.

Whatever the name, scrambled eggs supreme is a hearty breakfast dish that also makes a tasty light Sunday supper.

INGREDIENTS:

2 T yellow onion chopped medium
2 T sliced mushrooms (fresh or canned)
2 T green bell pepper chopped medium
2 or 3 T fresh tomato chopped medium
4 T chopped or shredded medium cheddar cheese
2 T butter
4 large eggs
1 tsp. flour
1/4 tsp. salt
1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/4 tsp. tarragon
1/4 cup half and half or milk
Dash (2 or 3 drops) Tabasco or other hot sauce

PROCEDURE:

Clean and chop the first five ingredients. Keep the cheese and tomatoes separate from each other and from the other vegetables.

Beat the eggs until lemon colored. Beat in the flour, salt, black pepper, tarragon and hot sauce. Beat the eggs and flour until well mixed and lemon yellow. Beat in the milk or half and half, tarragon, salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste (I grind in about 1/8 tsp.).

Melt the butter over moderate heat in a seven or eight inch skillet. Add the onions and mushrooms and sauté lightly for one minute. Add the green pepper and sauté for another minute.

Pour the egg mixture over the vegetables. Turn heat down to low and stir until the eggs are about half cooked. Sprinkle the tomatoes over the eggs, top with the cheese, cover and cook until the eggs are firm but not dry, two or three minutes.

Serve with toast and, if you wish, sausage, ham or bacon on the side.

NOTES: This recipe serves two. You can double the recipe, use a larger skillet, increase the cooking time and have enough for four.

Don’t forget to pass the ketchup!

Over the years I have had had to “make do” by substituting different cheeses and peppers or adding leftover meat. The eggs have still been supreme.

This basic recipe offers opportunities for the courageous cook. Check your refrigerator. Have a leftover bratwurst from the grill? A hot dog? A baked or boiled potato? Chop some and add it at what seems a suitable time. You may find a combination that you really like. And if you don’t, at least the leftover is out of the fridge.

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About Chuck Rang

Born in Ashland, Wisconsin, grew up near Hayward, lives in New Richmond, messing around in kitchens more than 60 years.
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